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WE ARE THE TIME

Art Lives in the Age of Global Transition

 

Conference-festival week

 

12—16 March 2012

Gerrit Rietveld Academie

 

with Koen Brams, Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield, Adjiejd Bakas, Arnisa Zeqo & Laurie Cluitmans, Sam de Groot, R. Radhakrishnan, Chto Delat, Ann Demeester, Black Swan Collective, Maria Hlavajova, Irit Rogoff, Hiwa K, Miguel Robles Duran, Franco Berardi & Aneta Szyłak, Chicago Boys, AA Bronson, Yael Davids, Adrian Rifkin, David Dibosa, If I Can’t Dance & Grant Watson, Boris Groys, Anneke Smelik, Miya Yoshida, Heath Bunting, Camiel van Winkel & Jorinde Seijdel, Fay Nicolson, Sally O’Reilly, Cathy Haynes, Tai Shani & Alfredo Cramerotti

This program was printed on demand (24 Jun 2017 17:25:02) from www.wearethetime.info

Introduction

In the academic year 2011-2012 Studium Generale Rietveld Academie presents

WE ARE THE TIME
Art Lives in the Age of Global Transition

Drawing inspiration from The Role of a Lifetime (2003), a work by artist and filmmaker Deimantas Narkevičius WE ARE THE TIME will explore the role of lifetime and life experience as a crucial source of ideas and inspirations, as a force that shapes ones’ art practice. Life experience is always generated as the intersection between the personal rhythm of one’s life and the larger societal perspective. How do we position ourselves in time? What are the decisive moments in our personal lives? What is our relation to the historical moment or context? How do we weave them into our life-narratives? The reflection on historical moments and situations together with one’s personal experience converge into a generative force that searches form in a work of art, an image, a gesture or informs one’s entire practice. The work of art becomes thinking history out loud.

From Tahrir Square to Occupy Wall Street – we are witnessing a desire for transition, but its direction is still open. This momentum belongs to the youngest generation of artists who will contribute to it with their work and shape it with the way they form fleeting communities. Can we imagine our lives and our work after twenty years?

With the advent of digital technologies and new regimes of representation, the rapid changes in our media-environment suggest very different ways of relating to the materiality of images and to their veracity. The network condition we live in, offers unprecedented possibilities to have simultaneous and multiple perspectives on events with social and historical significance. This implies a very different mode of historicizing, of writing down our memories. It is in this vortex of eventfulness we have to find ourselves again.

The project WE ARE THE TIME consists of 3 curatorial blocks:

Lectures on Wednesdays
November 16, November 23, November 30, December 7, January 18, January 25, February 1, February 8, February 15, February 22

Conference-festival 2012 & Shadow Cabinets
Monday March 12, Tuesday March 13, Wednesday March 14, Thursday March 15, Friday March 16

Shadow Cabinets

The SHADOW is a thing that has always spoken to the imagination of people. It is a Doppelgänger who always follows you, everywhere you go. It is a space where that, which cannot tolerate the brightness of day, takes place. It is the night during the day. It protects us from the burning sun and provides a shelter where we can meditate and ponder. It is a platform for artistic expression and gives depth to our view of things. It is a space describing a second possibility. The space where alternatives can be nurtured until they are ready to step into the light.

The CABINET started its linguistic existence as a term for a room which served as a study or retreat, furnished with books and works of art.

We bid you welcome to the shady places of the Gerrit Rietveld Academie during the conference We Are The Time. Retreat to the Shadow Cabinets to ponder and meditate. Visit rooms furnished with videos, sounds, performances, books, poetry and other arts. Copy the alternative first!

In our Shadow Cabinets you will find the Pirate Cinema for Historical Contextualization, the F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. Radio Station with daily broadcasts from the Rietveld Academie’s Glass Pavilion, a Soul Rebel Movement poetry workshop, a The Living Rooms discussion, a 3 hour lecture on film title design by Albert Wulffers, a search into the Metaphysics of Youth, We Are Neighbors (of the Rietveld Academie), ‘Chicago Boys While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming, a study group and 70´s revival band’, a Create Your Legal Identity -workshop by Heath Bunting, a World Question Transmission Center, and a Magic Mauss hunt. Shadow Cabinets take place in the main building of the Rietveld Academie but outside of the Gym, where the lectures take place. The Shadow Cabinets offer you alternative activities and interventions on a more intimate scale. For some you of them will have to sign in, but most are open to all. Several Shadow Cabinets are designed by student workgroups that came into being during a series of We Are The Time-seminars. You will find detailed information about each conference day’s “shadow” program – always in the black rectangles.

Mon 12 March
World Question Center Redux
with Koen Brams, Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield, Adjiejd Bakas, Arnisa Zeqo & Laurie Cluitmans, Sam de Groot, R. Radhakrishnan, Chto Delat’s Dmitry Vilenski, Ann Demeester, Tai Shani, Fay Nicholson, Black Swan Collective, Maria Hlavajova

 

From 15.00 to 18.00 We Are The Time presents the World Question Center Redux. In 1969 the artist James Lee Byars collected a list of questions through conversations with 100 artists, scientists, philosophers, and other prominent thinkers and practitioners.The artist’s World Question Center became a critical document of his time. For Byars, the perfect thought takes the form of a question. He believed that answers and explanations are not the way forward. For the performative conference kick-off the Rietveld Academie’s World Question Center Redux will merge an artwork past, with questions from the present for the future. Connections are produced live on stage. With lecture, presentation and performance by respectively Koen Brams, Maria Hlavajova and Jonathan Dronsfield, an interview with Adjiedj Bakas  and sweeping interventions by R. Radhakrishnan, Chto Delat’s Dmitry Vilenski, Ann Demeester, Ben ZegersTai Shani, Fay Nicholson, Sam de Groot and the Black Swan Collective. Moderators:Arnisa Zeqo and Laurie Cluitmans.

Mon 12 March

WE ARE THE TIME: Do You Have a Question?

There are 3 ways to bring in YOUR question:
— IF you want to present it LIVE during today’s event: contact annahoetjes@gmail.com
OR send us your question through Twitter with #wqcr
— OR bring your question to the World Question Center Redux  counter in the central hall of the Rietveld Academie where your question will be registered and processed.

The World Question Center Redux staff will process questions all through the week.

The most thought-provoking and beautiful questions will be published in the We Are The Time – book.

Mon 12 March

15.00 Lecture

Do questions require more energy than other sentences?

Koen Brams

Koen Brams will offer an inside in the historical performance that inspired this day. The World Question Center was a live broadcast (realized by Jef Cornelis) of a performance initiated by the American artist James Lee Byars which took place in a studio of the Belgian public broadcasting corporation in Brussels in 1969. During this performance more than twenty personalities – artists (like Joseph Beuys, John Cage and Marcel Broodthaers), scientists and media figures – were given the opportunity to ask what they considered the most relevant question. Questions were posed, no answers given. In his lecture, Brams will elaborate on this exceptional experiment.

Koen Brams (1964, BE) studied psychology at the University of Leuven (BE). He is the former director of the Jan van Eyck Academie (Maastricht, NL), and former editor of the Dutch-language journal of, De Witte Raaf. He was the initiator and editor of The Encyclopedia of Fictional Artists (Amsterdam, Nijgh & van Ditmar; Frankfurt, Eichhorn Verlag, 2002; Zürich, JRP Ringier, 2010). Together with Dirk Pültau he conducts a research project about Belgian art since 1945, of which the project about Belgian television maker Jef Cornelis forms an integral part (more info). Recent publications: The clandestine in the work of Jef Cornelis (together with Dirk Pültau), Argos/De Witte Raaf/Jan van Eyck Academie/Marcelum Boxtareos, 2010; Matt Mullican: Im Gespräch/Conversations (together with Dirk Pültau), DuMont, Köln, 2011.

James Lee Byars

James Lee Byars (1932-1997)

Mon 12 March

16.00

The Metaphysics of Youth

Location: Gym – ( as part of World Question Center Redux)

Adjiedj Bakas, acclaimed economic and social trendwatcher will join us for a consultancy session during the World Question Center Redux, and perhaps offer us an insight to the mechanisms of the business of seeing ones time.

“Within the context of ‘We Are the Time’ and the literature that we have been reading in class we have been reflecting on what it means to be of one’s own time, what it means to be contemporary and to have a glimpse into the now and perhaps into the future. In his text What is the Contemporary Agamben compares the now with trends and fashion as positioned between the no more and the not yet. What can one see while caught in a distress of time, between youth, memories and history?

On Monday our workgroup has invited Adjiedj Bakas, acclaimed economic and social trendwatcher for a consultancy session during the World Question Center Redux, and perhaps offer us an insight to the mechanisms of the business of seeing ones time.

Workgroup led by: Arnisa Zeqo & Laurie Cluitmans

Mon 12 March

16.45 Presentation

World Question Center (Reloaded)

Maria Hlavajova

Maria Hlavajova will speak about the World Question Center Reloaded as it took place at BAK in Utrecht in 2003.

Maria Hlavajova (born 1971) is initiator and artistic director of the FORMER WEST project, and artistic director of BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht since 2000.

The World Question Center (Reloaded) a public performance after James Lee Byars curated by Jens Hoffmann. The artists, curators and all the other participants in Now What? have collectively created a list of brilliant minds of our time. In a public performance these individuals are contacted and asked to pose questions through which to grasp the current state of knowledge and concerns about the world.

+ Now What? Dreaming a better world in six parts

+ World Question Center Reloaded (Google Books)

+ World Question Center Reloaded

Mon 12 March

16.45 Lecture / Performance

Art as Question as Prequel to Art and its Freedoms as Response

Jonathan Dronsfield

A reading from the book The Swerve of Freedom After Spinoza.

For Byars there is no doubt that art can question. His works are figures of the question, of first and last questions, questions provoking knowledge, questions of interrogative philosophy. Yet art is not philosophy. But if art can question then it must be thinking. Thought is not reducible to philosophy. If art can question then it can question philosophy, in the sense that the questions it poses are addressed to philosophy. This is not to say that philosophy is the answer or that philosophy masters art; on the contrary, in philosophy’s responding something about philosophy is drawn by art that philosophy by itself cannot see.

Jonathan Lahey Dronsfield is Reader in Theory and Philosophy of Art, University of Reading, sits on the academic board of the Forum for European Philosophy, London School of Economics, and is a Permanent Fellow of the London Graduate School. Author (with Benoit Maire and Marcus Steinweg) of Materiality of Theory. A book on Derrida and the Visual is forthcoming, as is an edited volume on Philosophy Art Music for Art & Research, for whom he is a contributing editor. Recent performative readings include Philosophers enowning that there be no own (SMAK, Gent), A picture of French literature (Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp) and Where language stops (Wilkinson Gallery, London).

Mon 12 March

15.00—

Library

Location: Downstairs behind the stairs

For those who like to read more on the topics related to WE ARE THE TIME the library sets up a reading corner each day near the gym next to the staircase. Quick snappers will get an overview of the relevant publications the library holds, slow flowers will have an opportunity to sit down and read.

Book of the day
IM FULL OF BYARS
James Lee Byars – Eine Hommage / A Hommage

Exhibition Catalogue: James Lee Byars was not just an artist, he was a magician, a visionary and a dandy. He knew how to put his audience under his spell. Byars bombarded his friends and acquaintances with letters of all kinds, thus demanding constant attention, sometimes without ever having got an answer. These writings testify to an incredible virtuosity and creativity.”Im full of Byars” will facilitate a survey of the work of an artist who was constantly searching for perfection (The Perfect), who equated the ephemeral and immaterial with the material and permanent, and whose work has forfeited nothing of its mystery and poetry to this very day.

+ www.kunstmuseumbern.ch

Mon 12 March

Broadcast

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O.

Location: Radiostation in the textile classroom

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts (4 hours broadcasting every day).

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. is a Live Radio/Event space inspired, in part, by the renowned Belfast independent record label, Good Vibrations. The project is a collaboration with the artist run space Goleb, the UK community radio station Soundart Radio (102.5FM), and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie’s very own Radio Rietveld.

Art and music have long contributed to society and our way of life. But in these dire financial times where media has been swallowed by giant conglomerates, and culture has fallen under the scrutinizing eye of market capitalism; where is the unifying space that announces its difference to the prescribed status quo? Throughout the history of popular culture, this collective space, appearing both physically and conceptually, has been a hub of creativity, exploring both new and old technologies and giving birth to new sounds and new vibrations. In Belfast, caught between the conflicts of its time, it was a little known record shop and label called Good Vibrations. Famous for producing the first record that was ever played twice in a row on British airwaves, it was also a space and a project that ultimately saw the potential of music to be a unifying force.

A little over a year ago it appeared that the Internet with its use of social media could be the free space where this difference could be heard; the apparent spark that lit the fires of the provincial town of Sidi Bouzid, that later reverberated to the cities of Cairo, London and New York. With the recent censorship laws being proposed on the Internet, our question as a group has been: If we could freely express ourselves, what kind of vibrations would we want to put out there? And the workgroup’s answer has so far been: F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. which after all is an intense love song.

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts. Follow the week’s events on Facebook. The entire project will also be streamed live on www.fireincairo.org. The streams will later be accessible through an archive on the website.

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. was initiated as the outcome of a work group tutored by Taf Hassam & Renée Ridgway

Coordination & Radio Hosting
Taf Hassam (UK), Kaja Wie Van Der Pas (NO), Maria Guggenbichler (DE)

Radio & Newspaper & Design
Carina Erdmann, Charline Tuma, Julie Hénault, Lilia Luganskaia, Lotte Voets, Mads Wildgaard, Marius Jopen, Melissa Tun Tun, Mickael Marman, Noga Harel, Øjan Døsen, Pernilla Roos, Sabo Day, Stefan Auberg, YURI AN, Vytautus Volbekas

House Band
Gerard Barry (IRE) + Charlie Stewart-Liberty (IRE)

Guests
Simon Ferdinando (KE), Natasha Ginwala (IN), Roel Griffioen (NL), Jakob Ehrlich (AT) + Many more

Tue 13 March
The Research ON/OF Protest
with Irit Rogoff, Hiwa K, Miguel Robles Duran, Franco Berardi & curator Aneta Szyłak; Open Rehearsal: Chicago Boys – While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming

 

12.00: Aneta Szyłak, the curator of this day, asks how artists are implicated in the condition of the academy. 12.30: Irit Rogoff explores the role of self-education in global resistance movements. 15.00: Miguel Robles-Duran contributes insider knowledge on spatial organization and circulation of speech in the Occupy Wall Street movement. 16.30: Franco Berardi dedicates his talk to the urgency of knowledge becoming autonomous from the pressures of market economy 17.45: Hiwa K speaks about modifying the academy from within. 18.30: The day ends with an open rehearsal of the Chicago Boys While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming – 1970s revival band and research group on the neoliberal concept that shaped the reality questioned today.

Tue 12 March

10.00—12.00 Presentations & Discussion 

We Are Neighbours

Location: Radiostation at the Textile department, Gerrit Rietveld Academie

The event We Are Neighbours is a proposal to extend conversations between the art school and its immediate locality within the contextual setting of a public conference: ‘We Are The Time.’ We find it vital to invite some of our neighborhood experts to participate in a collectively produced space where the issues of bearing witness to one’s time and constructing an image of Futurity are explored through hospitality, multivalency, productive ambiguity and humour.

We take as a notional mascot, the Viking figure – a misconstrued yet pervasive entity in popular culture, myth and folk history. The Viking creates an ambience of common ancestry, a sense of belonging through gene geography and an imagined tribe, yet it also hints at present-day dangers that lurk in such popular historicization and identity formations — violent other-ing, paranoid sociality and rising Right-wing sentiments that easily cast outsiders as vile beings to be treated with suspicion. All these factors are at play as we reach out to form a matrix of relations with those who live amidst us and attempt to chart propositions on our time and place in society.

Workgroup led by Natasha Ginwala

Participants & Organizers: Shauna Brown, Aisha Fouad, Michael Hautemulle, Cholena de Koningh, Max Kutschenreuter, Joost van Loon, Tamás Molnár, Olga Nordwall, Golrokh Nafisi, Liza Prins, Taro Lennaerts, Lovie Peoples, Stijn van Kervel, Kristoffer Petersen, Herman Pasakamp, Jesse Hoefnagel, Severin Bunse, Julie Cetti, Julia Hersckovits, Annika Kappner, Pipaluk Weinhold Andersen, Marije Seijn, Marlena von Wedel-Godens, Celina Yavelow, Sophie Roberts.

Tue 12 March

12.00 Introduction

curator Aneta Szyłak

“…how it is to be critical and what are the modes of performing our criticality?”

Gdansk 2009 Aneta Szylak fot. Michal Szlaga


Today guest curator Aneta Szyłak inquires how artists are implicated in the condition of the academy, in relation to economic reality and the urgencies of the political momentum. The question of education and research is not only what kind of knowledge can be obtained but more importantly how it is delivered and what is the organisation of this delivery. What is the coming form of social innovation that can break though the calcified forms we used to submit ourselves to?

Irit Rogoff explores the role of self-education in global resistance movements and possibilities created by non-institutional relation to knowledge. Hiwa K talks about his practice which at the time of his formal art education became the series of conjunctions modifying the academy from within. Miguel Robles-Duran contributes his insider knowledge on spatial organization and circulation of speech in the Occupy Wall Street movement. Franco Berardi (Bifo) dedicates his talk to the urgency of knowledge becoming autonomous from the pressures of market economy and new forms of alienation and asks for the embodiment of General Intellect. The day ends with an open rehearsal of Chicago Boys While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming - an ongoing project conceived and initiated by Hiwa K, that is both the 1970s revival band and research group on the neoliberal concept that shaped the reality questioned today.

Education appears to be central matter for the new social movements. It is not only being out on the streets and squares, but about the continuous intellectual labour of producing and circulating knowledge. Today we seek knowledge not only in information we can possess but also in the modes of operation we perform. Different occupy movements we recently observe or take part in are not only voiced disagreement but the become forms of social experiments. The time has come perhaps to ask, what kind of formation these movements can potentially produce?

What does it mean to be a part of it as an artist, bearing in mind the irresolvable autonomy/engagement dialectics? Hence, how is to be critical and what are the modes of performing our criticality? The speakers will from different perspective engage with memory, representation, formation and intervention in relation of protest. Through this session we are trying to look at the moment of protest as a research in action, through which new relationalities, engagements and forms of knowledge distribution are made possible.

At the same time the proposed film and video material (interspersed throughout the program or to be seen in the Shadow Cabinets Cinema) creates the installational ambient of the event and multifaceted ethical concerns connected to the decisions taken or delayed in the very political momentum.

Aneta Szyłak is a curator and art theorist, co-founder and currently the director of the Wyspa Institute of Art—an intellectual environment for contemporary visual culture in the former Gdańsk Shipyard, and the Artistic Director of Alternativa.

Her projects are characterized by powerful responses to cultural, political, social, architectural and institutional specificities and include in 2011 “Labour and Leisure” and “Estrangement” (with Hiwa K) at Wyspa.

2010 Estrangement’ (with Hiwa K) at The Showroom, London,
2009 Over and over again 1989–2009’, at Wrocław Centennial Hall,
2008 Translate: The Impossible Collection at Wyspa; Chosen’ in Digital Art Lab in Holon (Israel), in collaboration with Galit Eilat,
2006 Ewa Partum: The Legality of Space at Wyspa, and the group show, You Won’t Feel a Thing: On Panic, Obsession, Rituality and Anaesthesia’ in Kunsthaus Dresden (Germany).
Earlier projects include: Dockwatchers (2005, Wyspa), Palimpsest Museum (2004, Łodź), Health & Safety (2004,Wyspa), Architectures of Gender (2003, Sculpture Center, New York).
She has lectured at many art institutions including Copenhagen University, Bard College, New School University, Queens College and NYU, both in NYC, and worked as a guest professor at the Akademie der Bildende Kunste in Mainz, Germany.
She is currently pursuing her PhD titled “Curating Context” in the Curatorial/ Knowledge programme, in the Visual Cultures department at Goldsmiths College, London and Copenhagen University.

Tue 12 March

12.30—13.30 Presentation

Learning from the Future

Irit Rogoff

“…it is the art world that negotiated the delivery of ideas from the university to protest movements”

Learning from the Future focuses on the centrality of self education movements within global resistance movements. One of the arguments is that it is the art world that negotiated the delivery of ideas from the university to protest movements – by introducing various inventive platforms for the dissemination of ideas and the fostering of self education forums.

Irit Rogoff is a writer, curator and organizer working at the intersections of contemporary arts, critical theory and emergent political manifestations. She is Professor of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths, London University where she heads the Curatorial/Knowledge PH.D program and the Global Arts MA program. Rogoff has written extensively on Geography, Globalisation and on contemporary participatory practices in the expanded field of art. A collection of recent essays Unbounded – Limits’ Possibilities will be out in 2012 with e-flux journal/ Sternberg and her new book Looking Away – Participating Singularities, Ontological Communities will be out in 2013.

Tue 12 March

13.00—17.30

Oblique Strategies

The Living Room(s)

Location: The Salon

“As part of the Shadow Cabinets The Living Room(s) collective will host a session on collaboration and collective knowledge. Exploring different modes of collaboration inside and outside the art world, we will give a short description of our collaborative method using examples from our own practice. Then, we will invite the students to go through a process-discussion starting from the issues brought up by the students themselves. The session will last 3-4 hours (including two breaks) and participation is limited to 20 students only”.

“As a group we have been examining the notion/function of the ‘support structure’ in relation to creative, discursive and personal-political practices. In order to position ourselves within a field where ideas are being communicated (verbally, visually, sensibly) the ‘making’ of time is essential. The group have decided to employ a number of Oblique Strategies during the course of the symposium which aim to create moments of worthwhile thoughtfulness by visitors and fellow students. Based on Brian Eno’s editions of dilemma-breaker cards, these strategies become subtle supporting structures for active reflection on desires, misunderstandings, intentions and “errors” in the context of this intensive week.”

Student workgroup tutored by Clare Butcher

Tue 12 March

14.00—15.00 Lecture

The Anatomy of an Urban Struggle: OWS directions

Miguel Robles Duran

Miguel Robles-Duran

Last December 17th marked the one- year anniversary of Mohamed Bouazizi setting himself on fire in a desperate act of protest, a human spark that triggered a world uprising of historical proportion. In different forms, the Icelanders, Tunisians, Egyptians, Libyans, Syrians, Greeks, Spanish, Italians, British, Americans, and now Russians -to mention a few- have taken to the streets with numerous itinerant mass civilian mobilizations against the neoliberal apparatus and the global economic catastrophe it produced, declaring the urban realm as its field of action. Hidden beneath decades of market-driven urban practices, another way of practicing is defiantly emerging as part of the global uprise; from the living-death ruins of post-modernity, small groups of radical urban practices, which for years managed to resist and operate outside the crisp disciplinary boundaries occupied by capitalism, have slowly begun to collectively envision the organizational and material form of a brand new parallel urban world I was hinting at, a few paragraphs above. This points histrionically to a new kind of paradigm, the bifurcation of centuries-old disciplinary lines; one that will undoubtedly continue to demand classical practitioners to fulfill the representational needs and wants of the capitalist establishment and another that will construct a very different type of trans-disciplinary practice concerned with the production of the new parallel urban world. The talk will focus on the slow dialectical development of this new paradigm.

Robles Duran is an urbanist and Director of the Urban Ecologies graduate program at the New School/Parsons in New York, Senior fellow at “Civic City”, a post-graduate design/research program based in HEAD Geneva, Switzerland and cofounder of “Cohabitation Strategies”, an international non-profit cooperative for socio-spatial development based in New York and Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Miguel Robles-Duran has wide international experience in the strategic definition/coordination of trans-disciplinary urban projects, as well as in the development tactical design strategies and civic engagement platforms that confront the contradictions of neoliberal urbanization. He recently co-edited/authored the book “Urban Asymmetries: Studies and Projects on Neoliberal Urbanization” that reviews the dire consequences that neoliberal urban policies have had upon the city and discusses possible alternatives to market-driven development. Robles-Duran’s areas of specialization are design/research interventions and strategies in uneven urbanization and areas of social urban conflict, urban political-economy and urban theory.

+ www.cohstra.org

Tue 12 March

15.30—16.15 Lecture

The General Intellect is Looking for a Body

Franco (Bifo) Berardi

The reactivation of the social body is the condition for the full deployment of General Intellect. A process of dismantling of the general intellect is underway. During the first decade of the new century cognitive labor was disempowered and subjected to the form of precarization. The social and affective body of the cognitive workers has been separated from their daily activity of net-producers. The new alienation is based on this separation, on the virtualization of social relations. The new alienation takes the form of psychic suffering, panic, depression and a suicidal tide featuring the behavior of the first generation of people who have learned more words from a machine than from their mother. The insurrection against financial capitalism is aimed to recompose the social and affective body.

Born in 1949, Franco Berardi Bifo is a writer, media-theorist, and media-activist. He founded the magazine A/traverso (1975–81) and was part of the staff of Radio Alice, the first free pirate radio station in Italy (1976–78). Involved in the political movement of Autonomia in Italy during the 1970s, he fled to Paris, where he worked with Félix Guattari in the field of schizoanalysis. Bifo published the books After the future (2011) The Soul at Work (2010), Felix (2001), Cibernauti (1994), Mutazione e Cyberpunk (1993) and contributed to the magazines Semiotext(e), Chimères, Metropoli, and Musica 80.

He is currently collaborating to e-flux.journal. He is Coordinator of the European School for Social Imagination (SCEPSI) His next book, Poetry and finance will be issued in September by Semiotexte.

Tue 12 March

16.45—17.30 Lecture / Performance

From what If to As If

Hiwa K

“The artist will link his diploma project with the history of applying to different academies and elaborate how practicing and then abandoning painting as well as studies of music made him to develop forms of his practice today.”

Do you remember what you are burning

Teaching the former American soldier, now a caretaker of the art academy how to play the country guitar or cooking for the whole academy on regular basis with his mother via skype are only some of the projects realized by Hiwa K at the time of his studies. Some of them were intended to bring together the students who by institutional demand were trapped in their studios at the school.In these events interwoven into the academy he is seeking now the origins of projects such as Chicago Boys While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming or This Lemon Tastes of Apple which is related to the Arab Spring in Iraq April last year. The artist will link his diploma project with the history of applying to different academies and elaborate how practicing and then abandoning painting as well as studies of music made him to develop forms of his practice today. Hiwa will present the dynamics of the conceptual basis of his work which he describes as a move from What If to As If.

Hiwa K, Iraqi Kurdish artist and musician living in Berlin. He graduated from secondary school in Iraq and continued education in the self-educational circles of his home country with other visual artists, intellectuals, musicians and theatre artists. The major fields of these informal and non-systematic studies were European literature and philosophy, learnt from available books translated into Arabic. Since 1985, he has practiced painting – also in the public space. He abandoned the discipline around 1998 and completed flamenco guitar studies with the master Paco Peña, which led to working for several years in that field. Subsequently, he returned to visual arts and graduated in the Akademie der Bildende Kunst in Mainz, Germany and was guest student at Städelschule Frankfurt with Simon Starling. The practice of music has a strong influence on his visual arts projects.

His projects appear to be a continuous critique of art education, the professionalization of art practice, of staging and visibility as well as the myth of the individual artist. Many of his works are forms and outcomes of collaborations and have to do with the process of teaching and learning and insist rather on getting to know as everyday practice than knowledge as a formalized discipline.

Recently his project “For the Few Socks of Marbles” is presented in MUSAC, Spain and is contributing to the group show “On the Edgware Road” at The Serpentine Gallery in London. Upcoming shows include La Triennale in Paris and Alternativa 2012 in Gdansk. Past projects include Manifesa 7 in Bolzano, Alternativa 2011, “Estrangement” in The Showroom in London and “All the is Solid Melts into Air” organized by MuHKA Antwerp in Mechelen.

Tue 12 March

18.00—19.00 Open Rehearsal

Chicago Boys – While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming

WANTED: (aspiring) MUSICIANS. Take part in a discussion group -slash- 70´s revival band during the Studium Generale conference ‘WE ARE THE TIME’ at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie.

The discussions and open rehearsals are thematically centered around the neoliberal doctrine, which has it’s roots in the 70ies of the last century. In search for the roots of our contemporary capitalism we will use anecdotes, videos, or any other material you come up with and work towards the performance of a song.

Chicago Boys

Saturday the 11th of March we will gather to work on our song, which we will perform on Tuesday March 13th during the lectures in the GYM. The final song will be performed on Friday March 16th as the final performance of the Studium Generale week.

We are specifically looking for:
– A drummer and a drumkit
– An organist and an organ (or keyboard)
– A bass guitar and a bass player
– Two electric guitars and guitar players

But any other instrument is appreciated as well. Note that participating as a musician will be rewarded with some much sought-after credit points!

If you are interested, please send an email to jvdlaan@grac.nl

+ Concert gallery

Chicago Boys: While we were singing, they were dreaming  
The idea of the Chicago Boys as the 1970s Middle-East pop-music revival band and neoliberal study group developed over a period of months while I was researching YouTube for documentaries about the Iraq war and its connection to neoliberalism, and during the same period listening to the music of my childhood. The simultaneity created a kind of environmental connectivity that is closely related not by the topic but by the concurrence of the events.

The first edition of Chicago Boys occurred April 2010 in London as a part of The Edgware Road Project – The Centre for Possible Studies, the artist-in-residency programme of the Serpentine Gallery. I was looking for the project participants who, like myself, come from the Middle East and could possibly contribute to the project with their personal stories. The idea was to collectively begin tracing the global economic and political changes, especially connected to our region in the 1970s. The important ongoing changes of the period include: the US control over the means of banking national incomes from petrol, the so called petrodollar warfare; revolutions; dictatorship; and the growing span of pop-culture including music and TV. The world of 1970s was pregnant with the next generation of leaders who, like Reagan and Thatcher, in the following decade would became the major promoters of a neoliberal ideology. The next decades also brought the weakening or complete disappearance of the left in the Middle East which, in part, allowed the neoliberal order to spread without an ideological counterpoint.

All these elements were important when trying to trace back the reasons for Second Gulf War and the recent harsh effects of the rapid implementation of both democracy and neoliberal economy in Iraq. I found the lectures on the history of neoliberal economy by David Harvey, and The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein to be crucial resources. This started me on the path to look at previous models. The most significant being the forms of implementation of neoliberal reform after the coup in Chile under the dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1973 and the situation in Iraq under the appointed US administrator Paul Bremer who had vast power after 2003. The successful transformation of economies through political turmoil was clearly connected to confusion caused by the war, dictatorship, and revolution.

The title, Chicago Boys, originates from the nickname of a group of young Chilean economist who studied in at the school of Economics at the University of Chicago under Milton Friedman long before neoliberalism was introduced as a new global order. After their studies they returned to Chile under the dictatorship condition and started to implement the radical free market economic concepts Friedman theorized. General Pinochet provided the first nest for Friedman’s economic theories to grow and the possibility for the severe changes to be put into practice.

I have always been interested in the informal and autodidactic forms of learning. In my youth in Iraqi Kurdistan I was involved with peer-to-peer educational circles. The acoustic space and playing music has also always been a natural part of my environment. Perhaps the origins of the musical and educational exchanges in Chicago Boys can be traced back to these early moment. Music is a medium that makes possible the creation of an immediate and long-term informal set of relations. One of the intentions of the project has been to share what we know and what we wish to know in a way the musical exercises can be shared.

The composition of the ‘band’ in Chicago Boys is not defined – there are participants and contributors, but no members. No special music skills are required for the participants. Peer to peer forms are utilized, such teaching songs by ear and making visible the notes on instruments with post-its so anyone can play. Also playing collaboratively is encouraged for example with four amateur hands on one keyboard. Mainly contributors are young artists, students, writers and social researchers, most of whom are not train musicians. No expert knowledge is necessary. The contributors deal with the subject of study on more a more anecdotal and interpersonal level. We practice together, sing together, learn to play different instruments through visual means of notation, share anecdotes and experiences relating to situation that changed the lives of their families in 1970 and 80s. We dig into our family archives, YouTube channels and other resources to tell the stories, interpretations and conclusions that through their individuation and specificity add another colour to the panorama of relations between today’s neoliberal order and its roots in the preceding changes of 1970s. The state interventionism most of us grew up is questioned and the conflicting economic concepts and political views are presented. The selected songs were collectively chosen, originating from different regions Kurdistan, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and Lebanon. The songs are significant, not necessarily for their lyrics, but rather the context and the personal histories surrounding them. This also describes the way in which the politics is articulated in the project, approaching it as an association of subjective elements and parallel stories.

A Chicago Boys performance has the form of the concert, combining singing and playing instruments together with the presentations of anecdotes and videos that interweave the personal and political related to each song. At times this entanglement can also occur in the music. For example in Munich we played the entrancing ‘Talagh’ by the Iranian diva Googoosh from the early 70s. The song appeared in Iraq during the Iran-Iraq war when Saddam Hussein allowed the Iranian resistance movement, the People’s Mujahideen of Iran, to set up a Farsi-language TV channel in Iraq to broadcast propaganda. The channel also included Iranian pop music that had since been banned after the Iranian revolution. The song itself is a blend of traditional types of persian vocals with a driving electric guitar riff sampled from a track in the rock opera, “Jesus Christ Superstar” by Andrew Lloyd Webber. When we played the song at the Kunstverein it was altered to include another rhythm called the chobi chobi, a traditional drum beat from the south of Iraq that was appropriated by Ba’ath Party propaganda during Iraq-Iran war to support Saddam Hussein. These musical concurrences from different geographies and ideological affiliations can come together into a single song, and with this harmonial juxtaposition open up a new critical acoustic space.

This form of approach is necessary when working in a large geographic, political and multi-disciplinary community – where different knowledges, competencies and skills come together. The project relates to functioning in another culture what is linked to political, cultural and economic immigration. It is then touching upon living in different and sometimes multiple cultural formations. It confronts individualism and collectivism. The complications in the project come up in relation to the Western concept of individual liberation. An example is seen in the movie White Nights [Taylor Hackford, 1985], which was broadcasted on Iraqi TV during the Iran-Iraq war and after Donald Rumsfeld’s visit to Iraq 1983. The film depicts Mikhail Baryshnikov playing a dancer who escaped the Soviet Union – a position similar to his own biography as a refugee. In one scene, he dances alone on stage in a grand theatre without an audience, the movements defy the conventions of his training and find freedom to merge his own emotional state with the form. This is contrasted by cut-away shots of his former fiancee going through the rigorous classical ballet drills in distant Moscow. In Chicago Boys, different forms of continual opposition of elements and ideas that can be seen as the foundation of both music and politics. A difference that provokes an engagement in the process and demands that listening is not enough.

The project since then has developed in relation to the sites of Alternativa (Wyspa, Gdansk, Poland), and was hosted by Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory and if I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution (Holland) for a preiod of two months in the frame work of the Dutch Tour and The Arts Against Cuts Direct Weekend (London) among others.

The repertoire of songs and stories also changes and expands to include contributions from local inhabitants and histories wherever the project is hosted. So far, Chicago Boys travelled to Gdansk in the context of Alternativa at Wyspa. Then it had an extensive “tour” in the Netherlands, appropriating a well known romantic form of band touring, developed by Casco – Office for Art, Design and Theory and if I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution for a period of two months. Besides, it also performed at Nottingham Contemporary and the Arts Against Cuts Direct Weekend (London) among others and recently had a “class” in the summer school ‘Group Affinity’ at Kunstverein Munich. Each location encourages new people to contribute to the project with new economic and political geographies, private stories and musical contribution as the main goal of Chicago Boys is to study the issues of the project’s concern in an informal and collective way and distribute it in a form of music event with the number of oral contributions, archival examples and personal stories.

Read more at www.hiwak.net

Tue 12 March

12.00—

Library

Location: Downstairs behind the stairs

For those who like to read more on the topics related to WE ARE THE TIME the library sets up a reading corner each day near the gym next to the staircase. Quick snappers will get an overview of the relevant publications the library holds, slow flowers will have an opportunity to sit down and read.

Book of the day
Escape the overcode: activist art in the control society

This publication contains a selection of texts and essays by the writer Brian Holmes that engage with the possibilities and problematics of geopolitics and geopoetics. Holmes is a crucial contemporary writer and thinker whose insight into current social and political developments and how they relate to artistic processes opens up a new field of “geocritique”. The examples he cites extend across Latin America, Europe and Asia, where he looks at networks, artworks, films, institutions and protest movements for signs of how future progressive strategies might be shaped. The texts here are connected in part with the long-term collaborative research project Continental Drift.

+ www.halfletterpress.com

Tue 12 March

Broadcast

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O.

Location: Radiostation in the textile classroom

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts (4 hours broadcasting every day).

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. is a Live Radio/Event space inspired, in part, by the renowned Belfast independent record label, Good Vibrations. The project is a collaboration with the artist run space Goleb, the UK community radio station Soundart Radio (102.5FM), and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie’s very own Radio Rietveld.

Art and music have long contributed to society and our way of life. But in these dire financial times where media has been swallowed by giant conglomerates, and culture has fallen under the scrutinizing eye of market capitalism; where is the unifying space that announces its difference to the prescribed status quo? Throughout the history of popular culture, this collective space, appearing both physically and conceptually, has been a hub of creativity, exploring both new and old technologies and giving birth to new sounds and new vibrations. In Belfast, caught between the conflicts of its time, it was a little known record shop and label called Good Vibrations. Famous for producing the first record that was ever played twice in a row on British airwaves, it was also a space and a project that ultimately saw the potential of music to be a unifying force.

A little over a year ago it appeared that the Internet with its use of social media could be the free space where this difference could be heard; the apparent spark that lit the fires of the provincial town of Sidi Bouzid, that later reverberated to the cities of Cairo, London and New York. With the recent censorship laws being proposed on the Internet, our question as a group has been: If we could freely express ourselves, what kind of vibrations would we want to put out there? And the workgroup’s answer has so far been: F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. which after all is an intense love song.

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts. Follow the week’s events on Facebook. The entire project will also be streamed live on www.fireincairo.org. The streams will later be accessible through an archive on the website.

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. was initiated as the outcome of a work group tutored by Taf Hassam & Renée Ridgway

Coordination & Radio Hosting
Taf Hassam (UK), Kaja Wie Van Der Pas (NO), Maria Guggenbichler (DE)

Radio & Newspaper & Design
Carina Erdmann, Charline Tuma, Julie Hénault, Lilia Luganskaia, Lotte Voets, Mads Wildgaard, Marius Jopen, Melissa Tun Tun, Mickael Marman, Noga Harel, Øjan Døsen, Pernilla Roos, Sabo Day, Stefan Auberg, YURI AN, Vytautus Volbekas

House Band
Gerard Barry (IRE) + Charlie Stewart-Liberty (IRE)

Guests
Simon Ferdinando (KE), Natasha Ginwala (IN), Roel Griffioen (NL), Jakob Ehrlich (AT) + Many more

Wed 14 March
How We Behave
with AA Bronson, Yael Davids, Adrian Rifkin, David Dibosa, If I Can’t Dance I Don't Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution & curator Grant Watson

 

12.00: Grant Watson, the curator of this day, explores Foucault’s proposition that life can resemble a work of art. Couldn’t everyone’s life become a work of art? 12.30: David Dibosa will give an account of Foucault’s epistemology. 13.45: Adrian Rifkin will discuss the aesthetics of being a Maoist drawing on aspects of his own biography, as well as the work of others including the composer Cornelius Cardew and the Scratch Orchestra. 15.00: Foucault’s Vanity Fair interview will be performed by If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want To Be Part of Your Revolution; 16.15: AA Bronson will discuss Foucault’s concept folding together professional and biographical categories. 17.45: Yael Davids will give a lecture/performance that develops with the audience, ideas about listening, recording and speaking.

Between speakers Grant Watson will screen the following films: Cornelius Cardew, an Arts Council film, directed by Philippe Regniez (1986) & short films by  Maya Deren including : Ritual in Transfigured Time 1945 b/w 2’30’’, Meditations on Violence 1948, b/w 13’ with Ch’ao Li Chi, Divine Horsemen 1947 – 1954, b/w 47’ (excerpt), The Very Eye of Night 1952 – 1955 b/w 15’

Wed 13 March

12.00—12.30 Introduction

curator Grant Watson

“…what strikes me is the fact that in our society art has become something which is related only to objects and not individuals, or to life. That art is something specialized or done by experts who are artists. But couldn’t everyone’s life become a work of art?” Michel Foucault

Grant Watson

Grant Watson

The idea that life can resemble a work of art was suggested by Foucault in an interview with Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow which was published in the November issue of Vanity Fair in 1983 under the title How We Behave. In this interview Foucault comments – ‘what strikes me is the fact that in our society art has become something which is related only to objects and not individuals, or to life. That art is something specialized or done by experts who are artists. But couldn’t everyone’s life become a work of art?’

Elsewhere Foucault proposes that bios could be the material for a work of art, and points to classical texts whose authors describe an aesthetics of existence. From these texts Foucault develops the term ‘Care of the Self’ epimeleia heautou a system from antiquity, through which a person could understand and gain mastery over themselves and live a good life. Foucault’s proposition is that the rules governing epimeleia heautou came not from a given template (such as religion, science or the law) but according to an aesthetic schema. At its best this schema allowed for a process of self fashioning that continued throughout life, and which was completed at the moment of death when the form a life had taken was fully understood. In this, Foucault was not suggesting people today repeat the practices of the past, but rather that they try to invent new forms of subjectivity which could take aesthetics as a guiding principle.

Foucault’s proposition that life can resemble a work of art is explored in a one day programme of talks, performances, screenings and artist interventions which has been conceived as part of WE ARE THE TIME. The day will start with a presentation of Foucault’s Vanity Fair interview in collaboration with If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want To Be Part of Your Revolution, followed by a series of presentations from David Dibosa, AA Bronson, Yael Davids, Adrian Rifkin and interspersed with film screenings selected by participants.

Grant Watson is Senior Curator and Research Associate at the Institute of International Visual Arts in London (Iniva). Iniva (Institute of International Visual Arts) creates exhibitions, digital initiatives, publications, education projects and undertakes research, at Rivington Place and elsewhere, which engage with new ideas and emerging debates in the contemporary visual arts and reflect the cultural diversity of contemporary society.

As curator at the Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst Antwerpen (MuHKA) 2006 – 2010 his projects included  Santhal Family positions around an Indian sculpture, Cornelius Cardew, Search for the Spirit, Textiles Art and the Social Fabric and the Keywords lecture series. He was previously the Curator of Visual Arts at Project in Dublin between 2001 and 2006 where he focused on solo commissions from contemporary Irish and international artists as well as themed projects such as a series on communism that included an exhibition, book and radio programme. Watson has worked with modern and contemporary Indian art since 1999, researching this subject for Documenta 12, as well as co curating Reflections on Indian Modernism a series of exhibitions, talks and events at the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA). The touring exhibition ‘Nasreen Mohamedi: Notes’ is the first instalment of this programme. Watson studied Curating and Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths College London where he is currently a PhD candidate. He is also an associate professor at the Dutch Art Institute/ MFA ArtEZ in Arnhem.

Wed 13 March

12.00—14.00 Cinema

Hidden (Caché) (2005, 117 min.)

Michael Haneke

A film by Michael Haneke selected by Aneta Szylak in the context of Tuesday’s program The Reseach ON/OF Protest.

‘I have nothing to hide’ the main character of the movie says. ‘Really?’ his counterpart replies. The fim that shows the family thretened by the sense of surveillance gives the atmosphere of contemporary Europe, when collecting data and having anyone under control is legaly and technologically supported so everything about us can be known. At te same time major events that construct our reality are often under concealment bacause we want everything but truth.

This thrilling movie by Michael Haneke does not tell a big political story. The unresolved relationship of France official narrative to the brutally crushed Algerian uprising in 1961 revaels itself buy the violet history of the orphand boy who betrayed by the friend returns as a messenger of the denied.

Other screenings:
17:00 – 18:00 Disobbedienti, Dario Azzellini & Oliver Ressler, 2002 (http://www.ressler.at/disobbedienti)
18:00 – 19:00 What Would It Mean To Win?, Zanny Begg & Oliver Ressler, 2008 (http://www.ressler.at/what_would_it_mean_to_win)
19:00 – 20:00 As a Crowd Gathers, Red Channels, 2011

Wed 13 March

12.30—13.30 Lecture

Foucault's Epistemology

David Dibosa

For ‘How We Behave’ David will give an account of Foucault’s epistemology (=the study of knowledge and justified belief), focusing on a discontinuous and historically located understanding of subjectivity in his work.

David Dibosa

David Dibosa

Dr. David Dibosa is a cultural theorist whose work focuses on visual art and cultural difference. He is the Course Director for MA Art and Theory at Chelsea College of Art and Design and a Research Fellow in the University of the Arts Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation.

Dibosa’s research interests focus on issues of spectatorship in relation to contemporary visual culture. He is currently a Co-investigator for Tate Encounters, a research project looking at migration and national identity in relation to the display of British art. His publications include: Queer Appearances: Gilbert & George’s Visual Strategies in the journal Sexualities (2009); How to Speak Borders in the journal Toplumbilim (2007); Fatal distraction: art-writing and looking at art, in the book Put About: a critical anthology on independent publishing (2004).

David Dibosa trained as a curator, after receiving his first degree from Girton College, University of Cambridge. He was awarded his PhD in Art History from Goldsmiths College, University of London. During the 1990s, he curated public art projects.

Wed 13 March

13.45—14.30 Lecture

The Aesthetics of Being a Maoist

Adrian Rifkin

Adrian Rifkin

Adrian Rifkin is a Professor of Art Writing at Goldsmiths College in London.

Over four decades Rifkin’s work has followed a number of paths, some concerning specific historical archives such as The Paris Commune and others driven by conceptual and theoretical issues including the object of art history, queer studies and the narcissus myth; interweaving these approaches so that concepts are refigured within different fields of cultural materials. For How We Behave, Rifkin will discuss the aesthetics of being a Maoist, drawing on aspects of his own biography, as well as the work of others including the composer Cornelius Cardew and the Scratch Orchestra.

http://adrian-gaisavoir.blogspot.com/

Wed 13 March

14.00—17.00 Cinema

Moving Characters

Title design for the cinema by Saul Bass, Pablo Ferro and many others.

A marathon-lecture & screenings by Albert Wulffers.

Albert Wulffer is a (typo)graphic designer turned into film maker which might explain his passion for film title sequences. He teaches at the VAV dept at the Rietveld Academie.

Pablo Ferro

Saul Bass

 

 

Wed 13 March

15.00—16.00 Presentation

Foucault’s Vanity Fair Interview

If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution

For We Are The Time, If I Can’t Dance was invited by curator Grant Watson to consider how to present Foucault’s Vanity Fair interview with Hubert L. Dreyfus and Paul Rabinow. If I Can’t Dance will present How We Behave, delivered and conceptualised with artists Snejanka Mihaylova, Adva Zakai and Veridiana Zurita.

Snejanka Mihaylova was born in Sofia, Bulgaria in 1978. She was educated in Philosophy of Language at the University of Florence and at Das Arts, Master of Theatre, Amsterdam. Her work is situated between performing arts and theoretical thinking and has been realized in galleries and festivals internationally, a.o. Santarcangelo dei Teatri (Italy), Beursschouwburg (Brussels), de Rotterdamse Schouwburg (Rotterdam), Les Urbaines (Lausanne). She is currently a researcher at the Fine Art department of the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht.

In the past 10 years Adva Zakai has been operating within the performance field, both as a choreographer and a performer. She followed dance education in Israel and studied at the mime school Amsterdam. Her recent performance work focused on juxtaposition of text with movement, playing around with manners in which physical presence (mis)leads to a specific understanding of language. During 2010 she obtained an artistic research position in the framework of post-master program a.pass in Antwerp, for which she researched the influence of a curatorial approach on the development of new performance formats. In the same year she conducted the curatorial project d o m i n o k i n g d o m (in collaboration with architect Miriam Rohde) in Brussels (www.dominokingdom.be). She has been leading workshops and attending studio visits in art schools and dance academies in several countries.

Veridiana Zurita was born in São Paulo, Brazil in 1982. She graduated in ‘Communications on Body Arts’ at PUC/SP (Brazil), obtained an MA in Fine Arts at the Dutch Art Institute (Holland) and is currently attending an artistic research programme at a.pass (Belgium). Working with video, performance and text she is interested in the concept of persona as an event between discourse and physicality. Her work has been showed in Sesc Pompéia – Body Installation (São Paulo), Arti – Forum for Live Art (Amsterdam), CBK – Post Dordt (Dordrecht), Videobrasil International Video Festival (São Paulo).

If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution is an association dedicated to exploring the evolution and typology of performance and performativity in contemporary art. From its headquarters in Amsterdam, If I Can’t Dance develops art works and thematic programmes with artists, curators and researchers on the basis of long term collaborations, and presents these projects at (inter)national venues.

+ www.ificantdance.org

Wed 13 March

16.15—17.15 Presentation

AA Bronson

AA Bronson

AA Bronson’s work is an artist, curator, and educator. From his beginnings in a free school and commune, through his 25 years as one of the artists of General Idea, in his involvement with founding and developing collaborative and social structures and through his current collaborations with younger generations, he has focused on the politics of decision-making and on living life radically as social sculpture. Bronson will discuss Foucault’s concept folding together professional and biographical categories, illustrated with anecdotes and examples from the different phases of his life and career.

+ www.aabronson.com

Wed 13 March

17.45—18.30 Lecture / Performance

Yael Davids & Emerald Beryl H. Bouazza

Yael Davids: Learning to Imitate in Absentia I, 2011 (Picture This, Bristol, UK)

Yael Davids is an artist born in Israel who currently lives and works in Amsterdam. She studied Fine Arts at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Sculpture at the Pratt Institute, New York and Choreography and Dance Pedagogy at the Remscheid Academie. Her works are predominantly performance based sometimes involving herself as performer at other times working with groups. For How We Behave, Davids will give a lecture/performance that develops with the audience, ideas about listening, recording and speaking, as techniques used in the appropriate and transmission of knowledge.

Wed 13 March

12.00—

Library

Location: Downstairs behind the stairs

For those who like to read more on the topics related to WE ARE THE TIME the library sets up a reading corner each day near the gym next to the staircase. Quick snappers will get an overview of the relevant publications the library holds, slow flowers will have an opportunity to sit down and read.

Book of the day
General Idea 1968-1984

Catalogue from an exhibition that traveled internationally in 1984 – 1985 with essays by Jean-Christophe Ammann, Tim Guest, and General Idea. Eindhoven, Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum. 1984.

+ www.PrintedMatter.org

Wed 13 March

12.00—19.00

Poetry & Art Workshop On Racism

Quinsy Gario & Kno'Ledge Cesare

Location: The Salon (free walk in)

13.00 Spray your own anti-Racism shirt

14.00 WORKSHOP PT.1
- Racism – Through the Eyes of History.
- Q&A

15.00 Spray your own anti-Racism shirt

16.00 WORKSHOP PT.2
- Moving Beyond Racism
- Q&A

Dialogue is one of the art forms chosen by Kno’Ledge Cesare, Quinsy Gario and friends to update one of the most beloved traditions of the Netherlands. Sinterklaas is a time of the year when family and community values are once again celebrated. The problem however is that 11 years before the abolition of slavery in the Netherlands Blackface became part of the tradition through the figure called Zwarte Piet (Black Pete). Now 149 years after the abolition of slavery, the Blackface figure has become entrenched in the cultural psyche of the country and a lot of its citizens. In June 2011 Kno´Ledge and Quinsy started an art project speaking out against the racist element of the tradition. Their art project was a simple t-shirt with the text Zwarte Piet Is Racism (Black Pete is Racism) and called for dialogue with the Zwarte Piet lovers. By simply going to art fairs, festivals and their own performances wearing and handing out the shirts they engaged with people who either agreed or disagreed with them and provided facts surrounding the creation of the figure and its development over the course of its existence. On November 12, 2011, Kno’Ledge and Quinsy, along with Danish anthropology student Siri Venning and Dutch journalism student Steffi Weber, were arrested during the national entry of Sinterklaas and his Petes for wearing the shirt. That moment sparked international outrage against the figure and momentary national befuddlement over what exactly had transpired on that fateful day. For Kno’Ledge, Quinsy and their friends it was just the beginning.

+ www.facebook.com/zwartepietisblackface

+ zwartepietisracisme.tumblr.com
+ zwartepietisracisme@gmail.com

Wed 13 March

Broadcast

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O.

Location: Radiostation in the textile classroom

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts (4 hours broadcasting every day).

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. is a Live Radio/Event space inspired, in part, by the renowned Belfast independent record label, Good Vibrations. The project is a collaboration with the artist run space Goleb, the UK community radio station Soundart Radio (102.5FM), and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie’s very own Radio Rietveld.

Art and music have long contributed to society and our way of life. But in these dire financial times where media has been swallowed by giant conglomerates, and culture has fallen under the scrutinizing eye of market capitalism; where is the unifying space that announces its difference to the prescribed status quo? Throughout the history of popular culture, this collective space, appearing both physically and conceptually, has been a hub of creativity, exploring both new and old technologies and giving birth to new sounds and new vibrations. In Belfast, caught between the conflicts of its time, it was a little known record shop and label called Good Vibrations. Famous for producing the first record that was ever played twice in a row on British airwaves, it was also a space and a project that ultimately saw the potential of music to be a unifying force.

A little over a year ago it appeared that the Internet with its use of social media could be the free space where this difference could be heard; the apparent spark that lit the fires of the provincial town of Sidi Bouzid, that later reverberated to the cities of Cairo, London and New York. With the recent censorship laws being proposed on the Internet, our question as a group has been: If we could freely express ourselves, what kind of vibrations would we want to put out there? And the workgroup’s answer has so far been: F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. which after all is an intense love song.

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts. Follow the week’s events on Facebook. The entire project will also be streamed live on www.fireincairo.org. The streams will later be accessible through an archive on the website.

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. was initiated as the outcome of a work group tutored by Taf Hassam & Renée Ridgway

Coordination & Radio Hosting
Taf Hassam (UK), Kaja Wie Van Der Pas (NO), Maria Guggenbichler (DE)

Radio & Newspaper & Design
Carina Erdmann, Charline Tuma, Julie Hénault, Lilia Luganskaia, Lotte Voets, Mads Wildgaard, Marius Jopen, Melissa Tun Tun, Mickael Marman, Noga Harel, Øjan Døsen, Pernilla Roos, Sabo Day, Stefan Auberg, YURI AN, Vytautus Volbekas

House Band
Gerard Barry (IRE) + Charlie Stewart-Liberty (IRE)

Guests
Simon Ferdinando (KE), Natasha Ginwala (IN), Roel Griffioen (NL), Jakob Ehrlich (AT) + Many more

Thu 15 March
Extreme Makeover
with Boris Groys, Anneke Smelik, Miya Yoshida, Heath Bunting, Camiel van Winkel & curator Jorinde Seijdel

 

12.00: Jorinde Seijdel, the curator of this day, asks why radical forms of makeover are imagined and practiced so abundantly today. What kind of new ‘forms of life’ are produced? And how do these appear with art and artists? 12.30: Boris Groys expands about the transformation of oneself into an image of universality; 14.00 Heath Bunting and his Identity Bureau challenge the idea of personhood all together. 14.30 Aynouk Tan; 15.00: Miya Yoshida points at the amateur; 16.30: Anneke Smelik at the ideal of the hairless body. While at 17.30 Camiel van Winkel will discuss the ability of the contemporary art world to move “beyond the contemporary”.

In the interludes of the Extreme Makeover lecture program episodes will be shown from the American reality series Work of Art: The Next Great Artist. 14 artists are competing for a solo-exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum of Modern Art in NYC and a cash prize of $100.000. Witnessing above all the act of making art dramatized, we observe the participants going through an extreme makeover, from regular artist to artistic Idol…

Thu 15 March

12.00—12.30 Introduction

curator Jorinde Seijdel

“…with their pre-eminently precarious identities, artists, too, consciously or not, intentionally or not, undergo various makeovers throughout their lives, as they have done throughout history, from romantic genius to flex worker to, yes…zombie.”

Jorinde Seijdel

Jorinde Seijdel



People living in the 21st century are more than ever encouraged to be themselves and shape their own lives. But Western society’s belief in individualism and liberalism is also inseparably connected to a capitalistic market economy in which individuals and their lives are both products and the means of production. In the daily makeover games and reality shows, identities and lifestyles are used as raw materials and enticing signs and indications, and immaterial products are released into the immediate and full universe of the producer-consumer. Social and cultural identities are manufactured and sold ready-to-wear. Those who manage these identities exercise power and control.At the same time, the Internet and the social media have given rise to new ‘forms of life’ such as the data body, virtual persona and online avatar, which can be manipulated internally and externally. The DIY credo of the digital culture likewise has done away with the dichotomy of professional and amateur in favor of the ‘pro-am’, a more contemporary and more profitable and creative identity.

However, an alternative actor is also coming to the fore as a result of the interaction of the digital with material social reality, functioning as an occupier who, as an expression of biopolitics, employs its own body and takes over time and space in a new manner.

In the 21st century, the art of living is both a practice of freedom and a succession of transformations and transitions of people, bodies and identities in an assiduous search for autonomy and ideal self-images. The ‘makeover’, in the sense of a social and cultural metamorphosis, perhaps presents itself here as a kind of current survival tactic in just the right form, and can have both a camouflaging and alerting effect. And with their pre-eminently precarious identities, artists, too, consciously or not, intentionally or not, undergo various makeovers throughout their lives, as they have done throughout history, from romantic genius to flex worker to, yes…zombie.

Jorinde Seijdel is a writer and an art historian who publishes regularly on subjects that are concerned with the topic of art and media in the developing society and its public sphere. Currently she teaches Theory at GRAC and is editor-in-chief of Open. Cahier on Art & the Public Domain. Seijdel has contributed articles to many books and to magazines such as Metropolis M, Flash Art, and De Witte Raaf. In 2010 she published “De waarde van de amateur” (The Value of the Amateur, Fonds BKVB, Amsterdam), about the rise of the amateur in digital culture and the notion of amateurism in contemporary art. Seijdel lives and works in Amsterdam.

Thu 15 March

12.30 –13.30 Lecture

On the Use of Theory by Art and Use of Art by Theory

Boris Groys

“The transformation of oneself into a universal image, e.g. an image of universality, is, for sure, the most radical form of makeover that we can imagine and practice.”

Boris Groys

Boris Groys


We all know that “critical theory has a powerful attraction for the contemporary art scene. Many artists are eager to use different theoretical discourses for legitimization of their own artistic practices. However, why does an artist need a theoretical explication and legitimization of his or her artwork at all? And why has the global art scene become attractive for contemporary theoreticians? After a long period of time during which philosophy defined itself as contemplation of truth vs. art’s contemplation of illusions and fictions we can observe a growing mutual dependence between theoretical and artistic practices. Thus, it is necessary to investigate reasons for and consequences of this mutual dependence – both for theory and art. These reasons have to do primarily with a fact that both - the theorist and the artist – present themselves as being universal, as appealing to everyone and everywhere in our globalized world. The transformation of oneself into a universal image, e.g. an image of universality, is, for sure, the most radical form of makeover that we can imagine and practice.

Boris Groys is a world famous philosopher, art critic, essayist, and curator. He is Professor of Aesthetics, Art History, and Media Theory at the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe and Global Distinguished Professor at New York University. He is the author of many books, including The Total Art of Stalinism, Ilya Kabakov: The Man Who Flew into Space from His Apartment, Art Power, The Communist Postscript, and, most recently, Going Public. Groys lives and works in New York and Cologne.

Art Power Communist Postscript Going Public

Thu 15 March

14.00 –14.30 Presentation

Identity Bureau: an introduction

Heath Bunting

Identity Bureau challenges the idea of personhood by showing how materially produced an identity is. Heath Bunting explores the porosity of borders. Often performing as an interventionist or prankster and finding form within everyday acts of resistance, Bunting’s work reaches its public through systems of documentation and distribution including photography, print publishing and the web. Dismantling the divisions separating art and everyday life, Bunting prioritizes information and action. His work is based on creating open and democratic systems by modifying communication technologies and social systems. This presentation will be followed by a workshop for a group of maximum 20 participants.

Heath Bunting is a British artist based in Bristol. He is the founder of the site irational.org and was one of the early practitioners in the 1990s of Net.art. An activist, he created a dummy site for the European Lab for Network Collision (CERN) and works to maintain a list of pirate radio stations in London. Bunting has been commissioned and exhibited at a range of venues including Tate, London; The ICC, Tokyo; The New Museum, New York, The Banff Centre, Canada; Lovebytes Festival, Sheffield; Art Teleporticia, Moscow; The Arts Council England; Proboscis, London; The Watershed, Bristol and DA2, London, amongst others.

Thu 15 March

14.45—16.15 Workshop

Identity Bureau

Heath Bunting

The number of participants is limited to 20. Please register at the front desk or make an early reservation at tickets@wearethetime.info

Artist and activist Heath Bunting shows how you create your own legal identity. As Bunting demonstrates, identities can be constructed over time by developing relationships to place a given “person” within a web of shopping cards, cell phones, bills, government correspondence, and other “personal” data. Identity Bureau challenges the idea of personhood by showing how materially produced an identity is. In Identity Bureau he will sell the off-the-shelf natural persons he has created, and advise on how to use or make one’s own Identity.

Heath Bunting is a British artist based in Bristol. He is the founder of the site irational.org and was one of the early practitioners in the 1990s of Net.art. An activist, he created a dummy site for the European Lab for Network Collision (CERN) and works to maintain a list of pirate radio stations in London. Bunting has been commissioned and exhibited at a range of venues including Tate, London; The ICC, Tokyo; The New Museum, New York, The Banff Centre, Canada; Lovebytes Festival, Sheffield; Art Teleporticia, Moscow; The Arts Council England; Proboscis, London; The Watershed, Bristol and DA2, London, amongst others.

Thu 15 March

15.00—16.00 Lecture

Labours of Love Revisited

Miya Yoshida

Are the amateur and the professional each others makeover?

Are the amateur and the professional each others makeover? The notion of the “amateur” marks a distinctive shift in the field of modern cultural production, after which former boundaries between “professional” and “amateurish” were no longer easily pinned down. Amateurs are no longer those cultural figures whose “spleen”, whose “pure” and selfless love for particular objects or arts set them aside from other social groups. It also set them in opposition to professionals who were “only in it for the money”.

In the course of the 20th century, amateurs have become representatives of a cultural ideal – standing in for everything that one was ready to accept as “independent-minded”, “not corrupt”, “ethically sound”, “offbeat” and “innovative”. Certainly, under the influence of different cultural and technological revolutions in different parts of the world, the ethos of the amateur has been socially and economically co-opted thousands of times. In the last decades, it has been continually reconstructed by an all-encompassing global industry of images, objects and services as the very epitome of “creative thinking”, “solution-oriented management” and “innovation”. In this emphatic sense, we can now speak of “professional amateurs”, while “amateurish professional” still retains a negative by-taste.

Such ambiguities around the amateur have been further emphasized by the development of de-localized technologies, together with the wide distribution of electronic commodities, logistics and network connectivity, and are now found not only in cultural scenes but, at closer view, in every single aspect of our daily lives. Technologies have produced new media, new mediated spaces where different interventions happen – in short: today, a huge mass of “users” has gained access to means of mediatized productions. Such different interventions consequently produce different constellations of realities and reflections of an amateurish approach to life. How do we understand such new realities and how can we reflect them?

Miya Yoshida, as an independent curator and a postdoctoral researcher, has worked internationally with different forms of art projects and research. She worked for public commission works in Japan (1990-1997), and coordinated Akihabara TV project (1998), and Toride Art Project (1999). Since 2000, her interests lie in the topics on the notion of subjectivities and new forms of labour. She received MA media and governance at Keio University in 2000, MA art history at Goldsmith College, University of London in 2001, and PhD in Fine Arts at Malmö Art Academy, Lund University in 2006. She has been developing curatorial projects based on artistic research on mobile telephony, The Invisible Landscapes (Malmö in 2003, Bangkok in 2005, Lund in 2006), World in Your Hand (Dresden in 2010), and on amateurism, Labour of Love, Revisited (Seoul in 2011) and The Enthusiast (Heidelberg, forthcoming in 2012). She also contributes text for art/theory magazines, Texte zur Kunst (Germany) and Bijutsu Techo (Japan).

+ www.miyayoshida.com

Thu 15 March

16.30—17.15 Lecture

A Close Shave: The Taboo on Body Hair in Contemporary Culture

Anneke Smelik

In a technologically mediated culture the human body has become the nexus of new ideals which move it further away from ‘nature’. This lecture will explore the relationship between technology and the ideal of the body beautiful, in particular a body devoid of body hair.

In contemporary western culture body hair is becoming a taboo for both women and men. The ideal now is a smooth and shiny skin, not unlike the metal sheen of machines. Several overlapping cultural practices, such as commercials, fashion photography, pornography, sports and fitness, science fiction and cyber art, support the reconfiguration of the human body as hairless. Body hair is typically a marker that polices significant boundaries: between human – animal, adult – child, male – female, and man – machine. By analyzing images from fashion photography, cinema and digital art, this lecture explores issues of materiality and disembodiment in the digital age. Ultimately, the ideal of hairless body, the ‘smoothie’, is understood as a becoming-machine.

Anneke Smelik is professor of Visual Culture at the Radboud University of Nijmegen. Her latest book (in Dutch) is: ‘Ik cyborg. De mens-machine in populaire cultuur’ (2012). She recently edited The Scientific Imaginary in Visual Culture (2010) and co-edited Technologies of Memory in the Arts (2009); and Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience, and Technology (2008). She is project leader of the research project “Dutch Fashion Identity in a Globalized World”. Her research interests include the performance of authenticity in fashion, digital art and culture, and multimedia literacy.

+ www.annekesmelik.nl

Thu 15 March

17.30—18.30 Lecture

Contemporary Escapism

Camiel van Winkel

Is the time of the present a time of transition?

Are we experiencing a “paradigm shift” ? By analysing some typical examples of curatorial and institutional discourse that make such claims, Camiel van Winkel will discuss the ability of the contemporary art world to move “beyond the contemporary”.

Camiel van Winkel is Professor in Visual Art at the AKV|St. Joost, Den Bosch/Breda (Avans University), and teaches art theory at Sint-Lukas University College of Art and Design, Brussels. He is the author of Moderne leegte. Over kunst en openbaarheid (1999), The Regime of Visibility (2005) and De mythe van het kunstenaarschap (2007). His latest book is titled During the Exhibition the Gallery Will Be Closed. Contemporary Art and the Paradoxes of Conceptualism (Valiz, 2012).

+ www.camielvanwinkel.nl

Thu 15 March

12.00—

The Metaphysics of Youth & Hairsalon with special guest Aynouk Tan

Location: The Salon/Classroom

On Thursday Aynouk Tan will elaborate on her practice as fashion connoisseur and her thoughts on temporality and self-identity.

Within the context of ‘We Are the Time’ and the literature that we have been reading in class we have been reflecting on what it means to be of one’s own time, what it means to be contemporary and to have a glimpse into the now and perhaps into the future.

In his text “What is the Contemporary” Agamben compares the ‘now’ with trends and fashion as positioned between the ‘no more’ and the ‘not yet’. What can one see while caught in a distress of time, between youth, memories and history?

The Hairsalon
It is unrevocable that hair and hairdressers highlight the passing of time. On the one hand hair marks the passing of weeks and months as it grows and our everyday habits such as food, environment, drugs etc are inscribed into it. On the other hand the hairdresser’s salon creates a time capsule almost outside of time, infused with story telling as the cutting is being done. That’s why we will recreate an unusual hair salon at the Rietveld on Thursday where next to cutting of hair facts and fictions, gossips and psychological analyses will be mixed with help of artist (and temporary hair cutter) Tjitske Hemkes and psychologist Roland Snoeren.

Student Workgroup tutored by Arnisa Zeqo & Laurie Cluitmans

Thu 15 March

12.00—

Library

Location: Downstairs behind the stairs

For those who like to read more on the topics related to WE ARE THE TIME the library sets up a reading corner each day near the gym next to the staircase. Quick snappers will get an overview of the relevant publications the library holds, slow flowers will have an opportunity to sit down and read.

Book of the day
Mit haut und Haaren : der Körper in der zeitgenössischen Kunst

Eine Studie zum Thema “Der Körper in der zeitgenössischen Kunst” – das klingt zunächst vielversprechend, zumal künstlerische Arbeit heute mehr denn je mit körperlichem Einsatz verbunden ist. Die Glaubwürdigkeit zeitgenössischer Künstler bemisst sich unter anderem daran, wie sie sich selbst inszenieren. In Mit Haut und Haaren setzt Marina Schneede jedoch bei einer anderen Frage an: der nach der künstlerischen Verwendung des Körpers. In den sechziger Jahren habe die Body-Art den Körper zum Werk erklärt, in den siebziger Jahren wäre er “Material” zahlreicher Performances gewesen, und in den neunziger Jahren sei er als Materie künstlerischer Arbeit in Erscheinung getreten. Nach dieser Eingangsthese folgt die Überprüfung an künstlerischem Material. Dabei wäre die Klärung der jeweiligen Körperverständnisse hilfreich gewesen wäre. Hat man es mit einer essenzialistischen Vorstellung des Körpers zu tun, mit konstruierten Körpern?

+ www.zeit.de

Thu 15 March

Broadcast

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O.

Location: Radiostation in the textile classroom

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts (4 hours broadcasting every day).

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. is a Live Radio/Event space inspired, in part, by the renowned Belfast independent record label, Good Vibrations. The project is a collaboration with the artist run space Goleb, the UK community radio station Soundart Radio (102.5FM), and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie’s very own Radio Rietveld.

Art and music have long contributed to society and our way of life. But in these dire financial times where media has been swallowed by giant conglomerates, and culture has fallen under the scrutinizing eye of market capitalism; where is the unifying space that announces its difference to the prescribed status quo? Throughout the history of popular culture, this collective space, appearing both physically and conceptually, has been a hub of creativity, exploring both new and old technologies and giving birth to new sounds and new vibrations. In Belfast, caught between the conflicts of its time, it was a little known record shop and label called Good Vibrations. Famous for producing the first record that was ever played twice in a row on British airwaves, it was also a space and a project that ultimately saw the potential of music to be a unifying force.

A little over a year ago it appeared that the Internet with its use of social media could be the free space where this difference could be heard; the apparent spark that lit the fires of the provincial town of Sidi Bouzid, that later reverberated to the cities of Cairo, London and New York. With the recent censorship laws being proposed on the Internet, our question as a group has been: If we could freely express ourselves, what kind of vibrations would we want to put out there? And the workgroup’s answer has so far been: F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. which after all is an intense love song.

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts. Follow the week’s events on Facebook. The entire project will also be streamed live on www.fireincairo.org. The streams will later be accessible through an archive on the website.

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. was initiated as the outcome of a work group tutored by Taf Hassam & Renée Ridgway

Coordination & Radio Hosting
Taf Hassam (UK), Kaja Wie Van Der Pas (NO), Maria Guggenbichler (DE)

Radio & Newspaper & Design
Carina Erdmann, Charline Tuma, Julie Hénault, Lilia Luganskaia, Lotte Voets, Mads Wildgaard, Marius Jopen, Melissa Tun Tun, Mickael Marman, Noga Harel, Øjan Døsen, Pernilla Roos, Sabo Day, Stefan Auberg, YURI AN, Vytautus Volbekas

House Band
Gerard Barry (IRE) + Charlie Stewart-Liberty (IRE)

Guests
Simon Ferdinando (KE), Natasha Ginwala (IN), Roel Griffioen (NL), Jakob Ehrlich (AT) + Many more

Fri 16 March
I Told You So
with Fay Nicolson, Sally O’Reilly, Cathy Haynes, Tai Shani & curator Alfredo Cramerotti; Finale: Chicago Boys – While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming

 

12.00 Alfredo Cramerotti, the curator of this day, asks what the relationship between gossip and the history books is. Or between a shopping list and the future of industry in the digital age? Or between a general election and eternity? His all- female line-up of sparkling minds responds with thoughts and actions on recording, misreporting, mapping (time) and other niceties. 12.30: Cathy Haynes explores the improbabilities of temporal cartography. 13.45 Sally O’Reilly demonstrates the alien nature of historical speeches; 15.00: Tai Shani presents ‘registers’ of representation and an over-identifying actress. 16.15: Fay Nicolson digs up un-archived legacies of art education. 17.30: End of the week; finale with a concert by the Chicago Boys While We Were Singing They Were Dreaming – 1970s revival band and research group consisting of Hiwa K, students at the Rietveld Academie and friends.

Fri 16 March

12.00—12.30 Introduction

curator Alfredo Cramerotti

“Just as we place ourselves in relation to the universe by way of concentric rings of space – from home to neighborhood, to town, to district, to country, to continent to planet, to solar system, to galaxy – time too is made up of nested zones: today, last year, this decade, the last generation, next century, the ice age, the space-age future.”

Alfredo Cramerotti

What is the relationship between gossip and the history books? Or between a shopping list and the future of industry in the digital age? Or between a general election and eternity? It is difficult to pinpoint how our everyday dramas relate to the bigger story, but since humanity is indeed made up of humans, there must surely be a way of describing a particular time to include all those present.Just as we place ourselves in relation to the universe by way of concentric rings of space – from home to neighborhood, to town, to district, to country, to continent to planet, to solar system, to galaxy – time too is made up of nested zones: today, last year, this decade, the last generation, next century, the ice age, the space-age future.

The four participants Alfredo Cramerotti has invited to speak at I told you so, Cathy Haynes, Sally O’Reilly, Fay Nicolson and Tai Shani, address this relationship between near and far from diverse perspectives. Haynes explores the improbabilities of temporal cartography; O’Reilly demonstrates the alien nature of historical speeches; and Nicholson digs up un-archived legacies of art education.

But while these approaches are wildly different, there is a point at which they meet: each considers how we create or interpret documents which appear to straddle temporal strata, to speak to the future and past as well as the present.

Each speaker assembles, re-appropriates or re-enacts recorded information, and uses narrative as a vehicle to drive it toward new destinations. The tone might be media-savvy, literary or academic, but the result invariably shimmers between experience and fancy, the rational and the ridiculous, sentimentality and satire. The resulting hiccups in logic can reveal or re-arrange systems and structures that we might have forgotten are there. Social structures that condition our behaviour or cultural systems that influence our understanding of past, present and future become increasingly apparent as each speaker demonstrates how a diagram, public announcement or institution can be subjectively explored and how finite conclusions can be exploded once and for all.

Alfredo Cramerotti is a writer, curator and artist working across a variety of media such as TV, radio, publishing, internet, media festivals, photography, writing and exhibition curating. He directs Mostyn, Wales’ leading contemporary art centre, co-directs AGM Culture and CPS Chamber of Public Secrets, is PhD Researcher at the European Centre for Photography Research, University of Wales, Newport, and Editor of the Critical Photography book series by Intellect Books. His own publications include the book Aesthetic Journalism: How to inform without informing (2009) and Unmapping the City: Perspectives of Flatness (2010).

+ www.alcramer.net

Fri 16 March

12.00—17.00 Cinema

Program selected by Fay Nicolson in the context of her lecture performance for I TOLD YOU SO

Goldsmiths: But is it art? Episode 1, part 1, 15mins, 2010
Michael Corris: What Do Artists Know? 1hr 55mins, 2012
Robert Filliou, Teaching and Learning as Performing Arts (part 2), 37mins 27secs, 1979
Ken Robinson – Do Schools Kill Creativity? 19mins 29secs, 2006
Capturing the Relativity of Colour part 4, 1min 49 sec, 2011

Fri 16 March

12.30—13.30 Lecture

On Trying to Map a Life

Cathy Haynes

In 1759 Lawrence Sterne published the first volume of his novel The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman. But Shandy’s over-brimming autobiography takes two further volumes to explain the events that lead up to the moment of his coming into the world. Time and again we are brought to the brink of his birth before the tale swerves swiftly off again. The novel is a masterwork of folly, and a vital, irreverent, visceral mockery of the possibility of accounting for a life. It is also a satire on the newly popular idea that time itself is an entity that can be mapped – most neatly expressed in the book’s spoof map of its looping chapter plot lines.

Sterne’s novel is therefore a kind of anti-map that forcefully expresses the messy temporality that constitutes a life. In this hour-long session, Cathy Haynes will connect Sterne’s work with Walter Benjamin’s desire to set out the ‘sphere of life’ on a map. Drawing on their comparably knotty articulations of time, she will ask how we might begin to create a cartography of our own life, and invite us to make a mapping experiment of our own.

Cathy Haynes is a London-based curator, artist and writer. She is researching a history of official maps that contain an element of deliberate fiction: a secret code, a hidden message, a fake entity. She is also a founder faculty member and currently Curator of Public Programmes at The School of Life, London. She was formerly Curator for Art on the Underground, Co-editor of Implicasphere, and Head of Interaction at Artangel.

+ www.cathyhaynes.org

Fri 16 March

12.30—13.45

Magic Mauss Hunt: a total prestation

Location: in the hallway

“What power resides in the object given that causes its recipient to pay it back?” (1990:3).

“Beauty is like a train that ceaselessly roars out of the Gare de Lyon and which I know will never leave, which has not left. It consists of jolts and shocks, many of which do not have much importance, but which we know are destined to produce one Shock, which does…The human heart, beautiful as a seismograph…Beauty will be CONVULSIVE or will not be at all.”
― André Breton, Nadja

This project takes the form of a treasure hunt for the winners the gift of a Mac mouse. The theme and form of this project was developed by students in response to a wide-ranging discussion including this question posed by the father of modern anthropology Marcel Mauss back in 1923. His answer: the gift is a “total prestation”, imbued with “spiritual mechanisms”, engaging the honour of both giver and receiver.

Using the Rietveld mice, as an allegory of a shadow community,

the project (like the mice) diffuses throughout the building. Over two evenings we proceed to hunt the magic mouse, but in the process are we also beginning to become Mouse, Mr Mauss?

Tutor: Simon Ferdinando

Fri 16 March

13.45—14.45 Lecture / Performance

Gearing Up

Sally O'Reilly

“O’Reilly proposes to make a film that re-scripts grandiose sources, employing the rhetoric of political power and technological might to tell of humble victories.”

We may impress our own lifetime on history by leaving a genetic or cultural legacy, but we might feel that our standing is insufficient to make any comparable ideological impression. We can express this dislocation between the perceived scopes of the individual and history in terms of power, weight and impact – terminology that evokes machinery, engines, the overcoming of gravity for utilitarian ends. The empowered write the history books, as they say, but what if we built an engine of influence, which runs on the fuel of history itself, to give more power to our elbows?

O’Reilly proposes to make a film that re-scripts grandiose sources, employing the rhetoric of political power and technological might to tell of humble victories. The narration of centuries will be filleted and compacted to relate fleeting episodes in singular lives. By re-editing public service announcements, historical speeches and pedagogical documentaries, the language of achievement and promise will be diverted to recount modest accomplishments, common fears and minor improvements in everyday lives.

Gearing Up will represent moments of convergence and divergence between very different power structures, where individual desires and societal aims interrupt and reassert one another. The stories narrated will express this sensation of being in and out of phase, of fluctuating between the centre of our own time on earth and at the remotest periphery of universal epochs. The script for the film will be written from a meld of fictional and real sources, with the anecdotal embellished with absurdist departures and the fantastical made plausible through apparently credible detail. It will convey the strange brew – of the knowable, the impossible to grasp and the incorrectly assumed – that we call our ‘understanding’, and articulate how at times we feel out of step with history, at others as if we cannot escape the historical circumstances into which we are born.
The audio (the spoken script) will be edited together from cut-up sound tracks of found footage; the imagery will comprise new footage of quotidian machines that have been rendered unrecognisable. The back of a fridge or the underside of a car will become alienated familiarities, ambivalent landscapes where these stories, it is insinuated, have taken, or are taking, place.

Sally O’Reilly is a writer and filmmaker, contributing regularly to many art and culture publications, including Art Monthly, Art Review, Cabinet, Frieze and Time Out, and has written many essays and short fiction for international museums and galleries. Her book The Body in Contemporary Art was published by Thames & Hudson in 2009 and she was co-editor of the thematic, interdisciplinary broadsheet Implicasphere (2003-8). She also makes video documentaries, has curated and produced numerous performative events and was co-curator of the Hayward Touring Exhibition ‘Magic Show’ (2009–10). She was writer in residence at the Whitechapel Art Gallery (2010–11), and producer and co-writer of The Last of the Red Wine (2011), a radio sitcom based in the artworld. She is currently writing a novel, Crude, about art, flirting and the oil industry.

‘A whirlwind tour of art since 1990. O’Reilly’s wide-ranging knowledge of contemporary practices and her particular predilection for feminist and performance art make her an ideal guide … engaging writing and insightful observations … will keep any reader on their toes and will surely be eagerly gobbled up by those new to the subject’ – The Art Book

‘O’Reilly’s plain language and the simple structure of the book make it authoritative’ – The Art Newspaper

Fri 16 March

15.00—16.00 Lecture / Performance

Headless / Senseless

Tai Shani

“To the oscillating rooms where the subjectivities of heroines deteriorate, swell and gush, to the eroded streets where the interiors of imaginary characters and that of the bodies that animate them overlap in impossible ways.”

In this expanded reading on an impossible timeline, the lives and fictions of Annie Paradise and Jean Heller overflow and haemorrhage into each other creating a spiralling narrative told through  fractured recollections, dreams and desires.

An expedition to the edges of the inchoate territory of over identification. To the oscillating rooms where the subjectivities of heroines deteriorate, swell and gush, to the eroded streets where the interiors of imaginary characters and that of the bodies that animate them overlap in impossible ways. A perpetual decapitation, a ringing echo, a forever reflection between two mirrors creatinginfinitely nestled fictions that become reflex, gossamer body doubles of each other, ceaselessly interchanging through filters of fiction and mythology, erasing and voiding the original forever.

Tai Shani is an artist living and working in London. Fantastical and cinematic, Shani’s performances and films contain multilayered and self-reflexive narratives that are often collapsing departures from supposedly obscure historical dramatizations or abstracted adaptations of films, plays and books.

Shani’s scripts and texts alternate between familiar narrative styles and structures and theoretical prose that examine the mechanics of simulatory channels and their agency, the lives of fictional characters beyond spectatorship, over-identification and death in the fictional space , these intricate narratives are played out by elaborately costumed large casts of archetypal and pseudo-historical characters drawn from diverse cultural mythologies in Neo-Baroque settings.

Referencing early science fiction, Greek tragedy and theatrical spectacle, chaotic, a-historical and non-linear in form, Shani’s work explores fictional strategies, the cinematic memory, identification, as well as multiple temporal structures in the ‘real’ and the mediated.

+ www.taishani.com

Fri 16 March

16.15—17.15 Lecture / Performance

Marginal Notes / Curricular Documents

Fay Nicolson

“It is 2022. I am an artist researching the curriculum and history of a little known, independent art school that ran, in various guises, between 2013 and 2021. I have access to an archive of disparate material; traces of ‘real’ and digital correspondence and documentation. These myriad sources; from print outs of emails; audio and digital files; newspaper clippings; official and un-official biographic accounts, construct the fragmented aims, activities and legacy of a small group of individuals – who together, attempted to carve a path for a new generation of artists. Throughout its poorly documented yet tumultuous existence The Future School attempted to build on the pedagogic approaches of the near and distant past whilst responding to the demands and context of the ‘Teens’.

In 2013 The Future School emerged from a context of radical privatization and economic / educational inflation. In the UK, institutions continued to raise their fees and reduce provisions for students. Yet conversely, the pressure to continue studying; to obtain MAs and PHDs in order to establish one’s professional artistic career, increased. This left students in a paradoxical dual state of enforced poverty and increased professionalization. Other issues that impacted on art and the ways it was taught was the advent of The Networked Digital Reign: A paradigm shift from the stubborn order of information and the skill-shackled stroke of the hand, to the amorphous and omnipotent presence of data and the democratic mediation of the App(lication).

One positive result of these shifts was the reactionary emergence of alternative schools and academies; small pockets of self governed institutions that began to emerge as early as the 00s. The Future School was one of these small, independent groups that took radical approaches to teaching in order to generate alternative possibilities for an artistic future. The Future School’s current absence from contemporary discourse is perhaps a sign of its failure – or merely a testament to its active resistance to mainstream critique and absorption.
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The title of this lecture takes its name from Lucia Moholy Nagy’s book ‘Marginal Notes: Documentary Absurdities’ published in 1972. Lucia Moholy Nagy was Bauhaus Master, Laszlo’s first wife. Focusing on particular works and exchanges, this slim volume corrects minor errors and misconceptions, including details such as dimensions, edition sizes and circumstances of production. Whilst attempting empirical objectivity Lucia’s language cannot help but belie a personal agenda. Lazlo’s second wife, Sybil, wrote a book called Experiment in Totality, 1971. Fay is drawn to this rarely discussed aspect of Bauhaus activity and the ways both books shift between personal and social history, between the liminal margins and the centralizing total.”

As an artist Fay Nicolson traces relationships between form and content whilst elucidating the problematic marriage of history and documentation. She uses autographic, photographic, performative and textual approaches to making works that are often open and cumulative within specific constraints. Recent projects have focused on connections between art education and documentation; unpicking current fascinations with pedagogy through languages and strategies that are both generative and deconstructive. These approaches often erode the primacy of the written or the place of the record; renegotiating the positions of the didactic and the aesthetic. Exhibitions and projects include; Verlan, Twelve Around One, London, 2012; Constitution of the Damned, Landings, Vestfossen, Norway, 2011; The Anti Library, SPACE, London, 2011; La Verdad: The Newspaper Project for Manifesta 8, Murcia, Spain, 2010; In Search of the Perfect Lecture, RCA, London, 2010, ABC of Aesthetic Journalism, Künstlerhaus Büchsenhausen, Innsbruck, Austria, 2009; and Fictions, co-curated with Hugh Dichmont at Bonington Gallery, Nottingham, 2009. Fay writes for journals such as a-n magazine and Jan Mot Newspaper. Her text Never Odd or Even was published in Issue 1 of the independent art journal A Circular July 2010.

www.faynicolson.com
http://faynicolson.wordpress.com/

Fri 16 March

18.00 Concert

Chicago Boys

FINALE  of  WE ARE THE TIME : concert & drinks at F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O radiostation in the glass pavillion

Chicago Boys: while we were singing, they were dreaming… was originally commissioned by the Serpentine Gallery’s Edgware Road Project at the Centre for Possible Studies (http://centreforpossiblestudies.wordpress.com), where Hiwa K was artist-in-residence. It has since developed in relation to the sites of Alternativa (Wyspa, Gdansk, Poland) (www.alternativa.org.pl), Casco Projects (www.cascoprojects.org) and if I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution (Holland) (www.ificantdance.org) and The Arts Against Cuts Direct Weekend (London) among others.

Hiwa K invited students at the Rietveld Academie to join the project for the duration of this week.

Fri 16 March

12.00—19.00

Poetry & Art Workshop On Racism

Quinsy Gario & Kno'Ledge Cesare

Location: The Salon (free walk in)

13.00 Spray your own anti-Racism shirt

14.00 WORKSHOP PT.1
- Racism – Through the Eyes of History.
- Q&A

15.00 Spray your own anti-Racism shirt

16.00 WORKSHOP PT.2
- Moving Beyond Racism
- Q&A

Dialogue is one of the art forms chosen by Kno’Ledge Cesare, Quinsy Gario and friends to update one of the most beloved traditions of the Netherlands. Sinterklaas is a time of the year when family and community values are once again celebrated. The problem however is that 11 years before the abolition of slavery in the Netherlands Blackface became part of the tradition through the figure called Zwarte Piet (Black Pete). Now 149 years after the abolition of slavery, the Blackface figure has become entrenched in the cultural psyche of the country and a lot of its citizens. In June 2011 Kno´Ledge and Quinsy started an art project speaking out against the racist element of the tradition. Their art project was a simple t-shirt with the text Zwarte Piet Is Racism (Black Pete is Racism) and called for dialogue with the Zwarte Piet lovers. By simply going to art fairs, festivals and their own performances wearing and handing out the shirts they engaged with people who either agreed or disagreed with them and provided facts surrounding the creation of the figure and its development over the course of its existence. On November 12, 2011, Kno’Ledge and Quinsy, along with Danish anthropology student Siri Venning and Dutch journalism student Steffi Weber, were arrested during the national entry of Sinterklaas and his Petes for wearing the shirt. That moment sparked international outrage against the figure and momentary national befuddlement over what exactly had transpired on that fateful day. For Kno’Ledge, Quinsy and their friends it was just the beginning.

+ www.facebook.com/zwartepietisblackface

+ zwartepietisracisme.tumblr.com
+ zwartepietisracisme@gmail.com

Fri 16 March

12.00—

Library

Location: Downstairs behind the stairs

For those who like to read more on the topics related to WE ARE THE TIME the library sets up a reading corner each day near the gym next to the staircase. Quick snappers will get an overview of the relevant publications the library holds, slow flowers will have an opportunity to sit down and read.

Book of the day
East art map: contemporary art and Eastern Europe

In the West, virtually every move of the artist, the art market, and the art public is documented. But in Eastern Europe, no such system of documentation or communication exists. Instead, we encounter systems that are not only inaccessible to the West, but incongruous from one country to the next. Beside the official art histories there is often a whole series of stories and legends about “unofficial,” unapproved art and artists. East Art Map: Contemporary Art and Eastern Europe is an ambitious attempt to reconstruct the missing histories of contemporary art in Eastern Europe from an East European and artistic perspective. It is perhaps the widest ranging art documentation project ever undertaken by the East on the East, involving a large network of artists, scholars, curators and critics coordinated by the IRWIN group.

+ www.mitpress.mit.edu

Fri 16 March

Broadcast

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O.

Location: Radiostation in the textile classroom

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts (4 hours broadcasting every day).

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. is a Live Radio/Event space inspired, in part, by the renowned Belfast independent record label, Good Vibrations. The project is a collaboration with the artist run space Goleb, the UK community radio station Soundart Radio (102.5FM), and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie’s very own Radio Rietveld.

Art and music have long contributed to society and our way of life. But in these dire financial times where media has been swallowed by giant conglomerates, and culture has fallen under the scrutinizing eye of market capitalism; where is the unifying space that announces its difference to the prescribed status quo? Throughout the history of popular culture, this collective space, appearing both physically and conceptually, has been a hub of creativity, exploring both new and old technologies and giving birth to new sounds and new vibrations. In Belfast, caught between the conflicts of its time, it was a little known record shop and label called Good Vibrations. Famous for producing the first record that was ever played twice in a row on British airwaves, it was also a space and a project that ultimately saw the potential of music to be a unifying force.

A little over a year ago it appeared that the Internet with its use of social media could be the free space where this difference could be heard; the apparent spark that lit the fires of the provincial town of Sidi Bouzid, that later reverberated to the cities of Cairo, London and New York. With the recent censorship laws being proposed on the Internet, our question as a group has been: If we could freely express ourselves, what kind of vibrations would we want to put out there? And the workgroup’s answer has so far been: F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. which after all is an intense love song.

Throughout the week, different radio programs will take place with a variety of guests and a range of live musical acts. Follow the week’s events on Facebook. The entire project will also be streamed live on www.fireincairo.org. The streams will later be accessible through an archive on the website.

F.I.R.E.I.N.C.A.I.R.O. was initiated as the outcome of a work group tutored by Taf Hassam & Renée Ridgway

Coordination & Radio Hosting
Taf Hassam (UK), Kaja Wie Van Der Pas (NO), Maria Guggenbichler (DE)

Radio & Newspaper & Design
Carina Erdmann, Charline Tuma, Julie Hénault, Lilia Luganskaia, Lotte Voets, Mads Wildgaard, Marius Jopen, Melissa Tun Tun, Mickael Marman, Noga Harel, Øjan Døsen, Pernilla Roos, Sabo Day, Stefan Auberg, YURI AN, Vytautus Volbekas

House Band
Gerard Barry (IRE) + Charlie Stewart-Liberty (IRE)

Guests
Simon Ferdinando (KE), Natasha Ginwala (IN), Roel Griffioen (NL), Jakob Ehrlich (AT) + Many more

Colophon

 

Framework
Gabriëlle Schleijpen

Curatorial concepts
Lectures on Wednesdays: Alena Alexandrova and Gabriëlle Schleijpen
Conference March 12-16: Aneta Szyłak, Grant Watson, Jorinde Seijdel and Alfredo Cramerotti
Shadow Cabinets: Arnisa Zeqo, Laurie Cluitmans, Simon Ferdinando, Renée Ridgway, Taf Hassam, Clare Butcher, Natasha Ginwala and their student workgroups

Production
We Are the Time: Jort van der Laan
World Question Center Redux: Anna Hoetjes
Shadow Cabinets: Joris Lindhout

Communication design
Jakub Straka
Daiva Tubutyte

Ticket Handling & reservations
Nikos Doulos

Travel arrangements
Hemminkways

Logistics & technical assistance
Willem Rieder, Koen Taken, Lukas Hoffmann, Tim Mathijsen, Bert de Waard, Chris Meighan

Documentation
Malthe Stigaard

Catering
GRA Canteen: Eric Kammeron & team
Grey-house (guests): Barbara Paternotte

Invaluable support in a variety of ways
Frederique Bergholtz, Mariska van der Berg, Rieneke van den Broek, Linda van Deursen, Willem Jan van Dijken, Annelies Van Eenennaam, Rietje Gijsbers, David Groot, Tijmen van Grootheest, Viviane Issa, Kees Maas, Wieneke Mulder, Golrokh Nafisi, Sal Riani, Wilbert van Rossum, Urok Shirhan, Walter van der Star, Sonja van der Valk, Ans Vianen, Ben Zegers and many others.

Location
Gerrit Rietveld Academie
Frederik Roeskestraat 96
1076 ED Amsterdam

www.wearethetime.info
www.facebook.com/wearethetime
www.twitter.com/wearethetime
www.rietveldacademie.nl